‘Operation Varsity Blues’ Netflix: Who are the 33 Parents Charged?

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Operation Varsity Blues is unpacking the college admissions scandal that rocked the country just a few years ago. While Lori Louglin and Felicity Huffman largely dominated the headlines surrounding the scandal, there’s much more to be uncovered, and the new documentary is here to do just that. Operation Varsity Blues, which comes from Fyre director and Tiger King producer Chris Smith, recreates real conversations from FBI wiretaps to give viewers a side of the scandal they’ve never seen before.

When the film lands on Netflix this week, the streamer promises “an examination that goes beyond the celebrity-driven headlines and dives into the methods used by Rick Singer, the man at the center of the shocking 2019 college admissions scandal, to persuade his wealthy clients to cheat an educational system already designed to benefit the privileged.”

Here’s what you need to know about Netflix’s new college admissions scandal doc and the real people involved.

HOW MANY PARENTS WERE INVOLVED IN THE COLLEGE SCANDAL?

In total, there were 33 parents involved in the college admissions scandal. While they were all charged with different crimes, they each worked with Rick Singer, a life coach and college counselor who helped unfairly get their children into some of country’s top colleges. Between 2011 and 2018, the parents paid Singer $25 million to ensure their children would be accepted at Stanford, University of Southern California, and more.

WHO ARE THE 33 PARENTS CHARGED?

While Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman emerged as some of the biggest names wrapped up in the college admissions scandal, there were plenty of other parents who worked with Singer.

Here’s a full list of the 33 parents involved, per Insider: Gregory Abbott, Marcia Abbott, Gamal Abdelaziz, Todd Blake, Diane Blake, Jeffrey Bizzack, Jane Buckingham, Gordon Caplan, I-Hin “Joey” Chen, Gregory Colburn, Amy Colburn, Peter Dameris, Robert Flaxman, Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli, Mark Hauser, Manuel Henriquez, Elizabeth Henriquez, Douglas Hodge, Felicity Huffman, Agustin Huneeus, Bruce Isackson, Davina Isackson, Michelle Janavs, Elisabeth Kimmel, Marjorie Klapper, Amin Khoury, Karen Littlefair, Toby MacFarlane, William McGlashan, Marci Palatella, Robert Repella, Peter Jan Sartorio, Stephen Semprevivo, Devin Sloane, John Wilson, Homayoun Zadeh, Robert Zangrillo, David Sidoo, and Xiaoning Su.

WHICH PARENTS WENT TO PRISON FOR THE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS SCANDAL?

Although dozens of parents were involved, not every participant served prison time. Here’s who went to jail for their involvement in the scandal, per Vice and Insider:

  • Felicity Huffman: Served 14 days in prison for paying to have her daughter’s SAT scores fixed by a proctor. Huffman was also issued a $30,000 fine and 250 hours of community service.
  • Devin Sloane: Sentenced to four months in prison for paying Singer to get his son into USC as a water polo recruit. Sloane was also ordered to pay a $95,000 fine and serve 500 hours of community service.
  • Stephen Semprevivo: Sentenced to four months in prison and two years of supervised release for paying to get his son into Georgetown as a tennis recruit. Was also sentenced to 500 hours of community service and $100,000 in fines.
  • Gordon Caplan: Sentenced to one month in prison, $50,000 fine and250 hours of community service for paying Singer to fix his daughter’s ACT score.
  •  Agustin Huneeus: Sentenced to five months in prison for paying Singer to fix his daughter’s test scores and pose her as a water polo player to get into USC. Huneeus was also sentenced to 500 hours of community service, two years of court supervision, and a $100,000 fine.
  • Gregory and Marcia Abbott: Gregory and Marcia were each sentenced to one month in prison, plus a $45,000 fine and 250 hours of community service for paying to fix their daughter’s Duke entrance exams.
  • Marjorie Klapper: Sentenced to three weeks in prison, a $9,500 fine, and 250 hours of community service for paying to fix her son’s ACT scores.
  • Robert Flaxman: Sentenced to one month in prison, $50,000 fine, and 250 hours of community service for paying to have his daughter’s ACT answers fixed.
  • Jane Buckingham: Sentenced to three weeks in prison for arranging for a proctor to take her son’s ACT exam for him.
  • Jeffrey Bizzack: Sentenced to two months in prison, three years of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine for getting his son into USC as a false volleyball recruit.
  • Toby MacFarlane: Sentenced to six months in prison, two years of supervised release, 200 hour of community service and a $150,000 fine for paying to get his children into USC as athletic recruits.
  • Douglas Hodge:  Sentenced to nine months in prison, 500 hours of community service, and a $750,000 fine for paying bribes to get his children into USC as athletic recruits.
  • Michelle Janavs: Sentenced to five months in prison, two years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine for having her daughters’ ACT answers fixed, and having one of them falsely recruited to USC for volleyball.
  • Elizabeth Henriquez: Sentenced to seven months in prison, $200,000 fine and 300 hours of community service for paying to have their daughters’ test scores fixed and to get one of them into Georgetown for tennis.
  • Xiaoning Sui: Served five months in a Spanish jail and was ordered to pay a $250,000 fine for paying Singer to get her son into UCLA for soccer.
  • Karen Littlefair: Sentenced to five months in prison, 300 hours of community service, and a $209,000 fine for paying to have someone else take her son’s classes at Georgetown so her could graduate.
  • David Sidoo: Sentenced to 90 days in prison, one year of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine for paying Singer to arrange for someone else to take his sons’ SAT exams.
  • Manuel Henriquez: Sentenced to six months in prison, two years of supervised release, a $200,000 fine, and 200 hours of community service for paying to have his daughters’ entrance exams fixed and paying for his older daughter’s admission to Georgetown for tennis.
  • Mossimo Giannulli: Sentenced to five months in prison, two years of supervised release, $250,000 fine, and 250 hours of community service for paying Singer to recruit his daughters to USC as false crew athletes.
  • Lori Loughlin: Sentenced to two months in prison, two years of supervised release, $150,000 fine, 100 hours of community service for paying to get her daughters with Giannulli into USC.
  • Peter Dameris: Sentenced to one day in prison, three years of supervised release, and a $95,000 fine for paying to have his son recruited to Georgetown for tennis.
  • Diane Blake: Sentenced to six weeks in prison, two years of supervised release, 100 hours of community service, and a $125,000 fine for paying to have her daughter recruited to USC for volleyball.
  • Todd Blake: Sentenced to four months in prison, two years of supervised release, 100 hours of community service, and a $125,000 fine for paying to get his daughter into USC.

WHEN IS OPERATION VARSITY BLUES ON NETFLIX?

Operation Varsity Blues premieres on Netflix tomorrow, March 17.

IS THERE A TRAILER FOR OPERATION VARSITY BLUES?

Yes! Just scroll right to the top of this article and check out the video above, where you can watch the full Operation Varsity Blues trailer before it premieres on Netflix.

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